Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Oak Point Library: Interest Reading

Oak Point Library's Fun Reading Collection

According to a 2009 study, reading reduced stress levels by as much as 68 percent, which was more than listening to music, having a cup of tea, playing video games, or going for a walk. The researchers noted that participants who engaged in just six minutes of reading experienced slowed heart rates and reduced muscle tension. 
Study co-author Dr. David Lewis, a neuropsychologist at Mindlab International at Sussex, said: It really doesn’t matter what book you read, by losing yourself in a thoroughly engrossing book you can escape from the worries and stresses of the everyday world and spend a while exploring the domain of the author’s imagination. This is more than merely a distraction but an active engaging of the imagination as the words on the printed page stimulate your creativity and cause you to enter what is essentially an altered state of consciousness.

Click Here to Request Now!

Librarian's Favorites!

Kendi's books are must reads! He coined the phrase "anti-racism" because it acknowledges that we live in a world steeped with racism. As such, the world is not divided into racists and non-racists, but instead racists and those actively trying to work against racism. I also loved his book Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America.
~ Kerry, Librarian

Dr. Taylor's story of experiencing a stroke, while also being a neuroscientist was an immediate page turner, from her trying to remember what a phone was to organizing weird symbols that make out a single number. I read this story in one night almost 10 years ago and still remains as one of my favorite "interest" reading books.

~Liesl, Former Director of Library Services

Jonathan Foiles is a local therapist and lecturer at the University of Chicago. In (Mis)diagnosed, Foiles analyzes what it means to label someone with a mental illness and how bias distorts the history of psychiatry. This book is a reminder of psychology’s prejudiced past and offers a way forward beyond diagnoses. This book is a quick a fascinating read and its perfect for when you have a break! 

-Larissa, Library Assistant

Fun Reading Books!

Chicago Public Library

Always remember that you can get free books, ebooks, and audiobooks through the Chicago Public Library.

Especially during the pandemic get free ebooks and audiobooks from the library through the app Libby. This app is great for you phone or tablet or computer and it syncs to Kindle as well!

If you need any help please contact your local library and we are always happy to help as well!